Stoa of Attalos

The Stoa of Attalos is the only example of a fully restored ancient shopping arcade. It was built by and named after Attalos II, King of Pergamon, as a gift to the city that gave him his higher education.

It’s an impressive two-storey building, 116 m x 19.4 m (381 ft x 63 ft 8 in), with a Doric colonnade on the ground floor, and an Ionic colonnade on the upper floor. There were 21 shops at the back of both floors. Today it houses the museum of the Ancient Agora, and part of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens.

Stoas were really important for the ancient Greeks and the Romans as it was there that they used to meet, walk, shop and do business. It was completely destroyed in 267 AD by a savage tribe, the Herulians but in the 1950s, thanks to the Rockefeller Foundation, the Stoa of Attalos, using the original materials found on site, was fully reconstructed on the original foundations!

This reconstructed ancient building is also of great significance for modern European history as on 16 April 2003 the ceremony of the signing of the 2003 Treaty of Accession of ten new countries to the European Union was conducted there.

STOA OF ATTALOSs2

Published by George Kokkos

Having studied Ancient History and Archaeology both in Britain and in Greece, George took part in different excavations, worked as a translator, private tutor. Since 2009 he focuses on Educational Tourism as a tour creator & manager, while in 2019 he became a founding member of the 'Traveling Students Academy', based in Atlanta GA. An aspiring science popularizer and indefatigable lecturer in academic or tourism settings, George's mastery is to make accessible complex and profound subject matter that can then be appreciated by an extremely broad audience. George has just published a book on Ancient Greek philosophy, while his main focus the last five years is the history of the ancient Athenian Democracy and her impact on modern-day republics. He has lectured extensively on the values of Democracy in schools, universities, the 'European Commission Learning Center' etc.

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